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FOOTNOTES


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1.

The three sponsoring organizations were the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the National Science Academy and the National Research Council (back to text)

2.

Ronald C. Toey, THE AMERICAN IDEOLOGY OF NATIONAL SCIENCES, 1919-1930 (Pittsburg:University of Pittsburg Press, 1971), pp.69-71. The news-letter was supposedly born in response to popular demand from readers of Science Service's newspaper reports. However, the idea that Science Service publish a popular science joutnal was suggested by Edwin Slosson as early as August 19, 1920. SNL, 2 October, 1926. Tobey, p. 71. (back to text)

3.

SNL, v. 11, no. 300, 1928, p. 32 (back to text)

4.

For a discussion of the scientific ideology of Edwin slosson, see Tobey's third chapter entitled "Science Service." Toby, however, does not deal with any of slosson's writtings on SNL, perhaps becuase of the difficulty of reconstruction the necessatily diffuse ideolgical content of a weekly news journal (back to text)

5.

SNL, 1928, ?. These figures, which are taken from advertsements and may be somewhat exaggeranted, represent a considerable jump from the tow and one-half million newspaper readers claimed in 1926. SNL, peared in nearly 100 cities in 10 states, mostly in the eastern half of the nation. Also in 1926, Science Service syndicated radio talkes on ""Science News Of The Week" to 14 radio stations, increasing by 1929 to 22 stations (back to text)

6.

SNL, v.13, no. 367, ?. (back to text)

7.

SNL, v.11, no. 306, p.1. (back to text)

8.

SNL, December, 1928, p. 382 (back to text)

9.

SNL, v. 5, no.91, p. 2.(back to text)

10.

SNL,1929,?. (back to text)

11.

Among those travelling to Dayton, Tennessee to provide scientific testimony on behalf of exolution were SNL's managing editor, Watson Davis, and science writer Frank Thone. SNL, 7 August, 1925, p. 130. Thone later served as treasurer of a fund-raising committee to send Schopes to graduate school, and a solicitation of this purpose was printed in SNL (back to text)

12.

SNL, 5 January, 1923, p.1 (back to text)

13.

SNL, v. 13, no.353, 1928, p.21 (back to text)

14.

Ibid, p. 22. (back to text)

15.

"The efforts of psychic researchers, who are attemption a'scientific' proff of hte 'other' world, would, if successful, destroy religion, thinks Dr. Knight Dunlap, professor of psychology at Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Dunlap, however, said emphatically that he does not htink there is the remotest chance of their success" SNL v. 13, no. 363, 1928, p. 185.(back to text)

16.

SNL, v. 1, no. 89, 1922, pp.4-5 (back to text)

17.

SNL, v. 5, no. 172, p.1 (back to text)

18.

SNL, v. 12, no. 330, 1927, p. 95 (back to text)

19.

Watson Davis, ed., THE ADVANCE OF SCIENCE (Garden city, N.Y.: Doubleday, Doran, and Co., 1934), pp. 260-263. (back to text)

20.

SNL, 24 January, 1925, p.6(back to text)

21.

Watson Davis, pp. 243-245(back to text)

22.

SNL, 1927, ?. [sic](back to text)

23.

SNL, v. 10, no. 289, p. 253.(back to text)

24.

SNL, ?. [sic] (back to text)

25.

[Footnote missing from original - ed.] (back to text)

26.

George Basalla, "Pop Science," in SCIENCE AND ITS PUBLIC: THE CHANGING RELATIONSHIP, ed. Gerald Holton and William Blanpied. boston Studies in the Philosophyof Science, vol. 33 (Boston: D. Reidel Publishing Co., 1967), p. 273. (back to text)

27.

SNL v. 12, no. 343, 1927, p. 304 (back to text)

28.

SNL, v.14, no. 388, p.165. (back to text)

29.

SNL, v. 14, no. 335, p. 113. (back to text)

30.

SNL, 23 October, 1926, p. 49. (back to text)

31.

SNL, v. 14, no. 298, 1928, pp. 323-324. (back to text)

32.

SNL, v. 14, no. 399, 1928, pp. 335-36. (back to text)

33.

See Tobey's fourth chapter, "The Einstein Controversy, 1919-1924. (back to text)

34.

SCIENCE, 24 November, 1922, p. 603 (back to text)

35.

SCIENCE, 29 december, 1922, pp. 752-54 (back to text)

36.

for example, Heisenberg's "uncertainty principle" was published in 1927, but did not appear in SNL until 1929. SNL, 27 April, 1929, ?.(back to text)

37.

SNL, 28 December, 1929, p. 395. (back to text)

38.

SNL, v. 5 , no. 175, 1924, p.1. (back to text)

39.

SNL, v. 14 no. 380, 1928, p. 28 (back to text)

 


Copyright David J. Rhees, 1979



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