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1966 - Drs. Neil Weber (left) and Joseph T. Kummer, shown with an operating cell and a model of a 2,000 watt unit, the new sodium-sulfur battery system

MAJOR BREAKTHROUGH

CD 2055016 E&MP1.031

Automobiles, Electric

October 31, 1966

Ford Motor Company has demonstrated a major breakthrough in its efforts to develop a feasible power source for electric vehicles. Developed by Drs. Neil Weber (left) and Joseph T. Kummer, shown with an operating cell and a model of a 2,000 watt unit, the new sodium-sulfur battery system should be able to store up to fifteen times the amount of electrical energy available from present lead-acid storage batteries.

The heart of the new system is a Ford-developed crystalline ceramic electrolyte composed largely of aluminum oxide and based on a material known as beta-alumina.

Further development of the Ford battery should lead to an economical, rechargeable battery system which, when adapted to a vehicle would provide greatly improved acceleration and range capabilities than now available from existing batteries. 


Original Caption by Science Service
Ford Motor Company



National Museum of American History

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