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1957 - new cylindrical, one-inch long battery has a projected life of over 20 years

MITE-SIZED METHUSELAH

CD 2055024 E&MP3.008

Batteries

February 6, 1957

The General Electric Company announced today that it is in pilot production here on a tiny new power source, only 1/35 the size of a common flashlight battery, but with 60 times the voltage of such a battery.

Designed for highly-specialized uses requiring small size, long life, and high voltage output, the new cylindrical, one-inch long battery has a projected life of over 20 years.

The company believes it can be a new power source in such equipment as remote fire and radiation warning devices, deep well survey equipment, and electronic instruments.

additional text found

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE MITE-SIZED METHUSELAH is this tiny new General Electric battery which engineers calculate can deliver 95 volts after 20 years. Developed for electronic instruments and other highly-specialized devices, it costs $12.50 and is in pilot production at company’s Auburn, N.Y. plant.

The General Electric Company announced today that it is in pilot production here on a tiny new power source, only 1/35 the size of a common flashlight battery, but with 60 times the voltage of such a battery.

Designed for highly-specialized uses requiring small size, long life, and high voltage output, the new cylindrical, one-inch long battery has a projected life of over 20 years.

The company believes it can be a new power source in such equipment as remote fire and radiation warning devices, deep well survey equipment, and electronic instruments.

The new battery produces 95 volts. It weighs less than one-fifth ounce and is less than one-third inch in diameter.

According to engineers of the G-E Specialty Electronic Components Department here, the battery’s long life and other unusual features result from its solid, dry internal construction.

It contains 127 hair-thin disks, of silver and copper compounds and carbon, stacked tightly within the case.

Present price of the battery is $12.50, but the company believes mass production could eventually lower this to about one dollar.

Research and development on the battery were carried out by Dr. W.J. van der Grinten of the company’s Electronics Laboratory, Syracuse, N.Y., who began the work while at the G-E Research Laboratory, Schenectady, N.Y.
  Original Caption by Science Service
©General Electric



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