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1938 - coaxial cable is only seven-eighths of an inch in diameter

IT ISN’T VERY BIG

CD 2055049 E&MP5.016

Cables, Coaxial

March 12, 1938

The coaxial cable is only seven-eighths of an inch in diameter, and in its lead sheath are two coaxial channels, each capable of carrying a million-cycle band, and eight wires for controls or any other desired use.

So complex and difficult is the construction of this cable that special stranding machines had to be developed before construction was started, and special tools were invented for its installation.

additional text found

Coaxial cable, capable of handling the enormously high frequencies used in television signals, has been developed for use in wired television within cities from studios to transmitters and from pickup points.

The whole cable is only seven-eighths of an inch in diameter and within its outer sheath are two coaxial cables, each capable of carrying a million cycle band, and eight wires for controls and other uses.


Original Caption by Science Service
Bell Telephone Laboratories



National Museum of American History

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