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1944 - bushing conducts 230,000 volts, but porcelain saucers prevent high voltage electricity from flashing over

GIANT SPARK PLUG FOR WAR POWER

CD 2478046 E&MP12.015

Electric Appliances & Apparatus

January 19, 1944

This 14-foot-long "spark plug" is part of a giant automatic switch that will guard flow of electric power into a new war plant in the Pacific Northwest.

Called a condenser bushing, the plug is shown being prepared for a test at the East Pittsburgh Works of the Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Company.

The bushing conducts 230,000 volts of electric power into the tank on which the workman is standing, just as a spark plug in our automobile conducts electricity into the gas-filled cylinder.

Inside the tank is a disconnecting device that shuts off the power in a twentieth of a second when a short circuit occurs.

More than 5,000 gallons of oil in the tank "drown" the blue-hot electric arc created by opening this switch.

The six-foot pile of porcelain "saucers" forming the upper half of the bushing prevents high voltage electricity from flashing over between the tank and the transmission line.

additional text found...

GIANT "SPARK PLUG"
This 14-foot condenser bushing is part of a huge automatic switch that will guard flow of electric power into a new Westinghouse war plant.

The bushing conducts 230,000 volts of power into the tank on which the workman is standing, just as a spark plug in your automobile conducts electricity into the gas-filled cylinder.
 


Original Caption by Science Service
Westinghouse



National Museum of American History

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