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1942 - U.S.S. Heron distinguished in action in the Pacific, is a converted mine sweeper w/larger view

U.S.S. HERON

CD 2478061 E&MP12.040

Electric Appliances & Apparatus

January 26, 1942

THE U.S.S. Heron1, shown [right] below, distinguished in action in the Pacific, is a converted mine sweeper.

It acts only as a nautical filling station for large flying boats and cannot be used to aid in launching of any type of aircraft. 


Original Caption by Science Service
United States Navy


Comment 7.17.2009
On this page http://scienceservice.si.edu/pages/012040.htm you have a picture of the USS Heron (AM10) (AVP2) which is obviously not a minesweeper. I have discovered two other USS Herons . The profile shows the WW2 markings.

Lapwing Class Minesweeper:
· Laid down, 26 August 1917 by Standard Shipbuilding Co., New York
· Launched, 18 May 1918
· Commissioned USS Heron, Minesweeper No. 10, 30 October 1918
· Designated AM-10, 17 February 1920
· Decommissioned 6 April 1922 at Cavite Navy Yard, Philippine Islands
· Recommissioned, 18 December 1924
· Reclassified as a Small Seaplane Tender, AVP-2, 27 January 1936
· Decommissioned 12 February 1946 at Subic Bay Naval Station, PI
· Struck from the Naval Register in 1946
· Transferred to the U.S. State Department, Foreign Liquidation Commission in July 1947 for disposal
· Fate unknown.

AM-10 Specifications:
· Displacement 950 t. (1,350 t. as AVP-2)
· Length 187' 10"
· Beam 35' 6'
· Draft 9' 10" (13' 1" as AVP-2)
· Speed 14 kts. (13.5 kts. AVP-2)
· Complement 78 (85 as AVP-2)
· Armament: Two 3" gun mounts and machine guns (two 3/50 dual purpose mounts AVP-2)
· Propulsion: Two Babcock and Wilcox header boilers,one 1,400 shp Harlan and Hollingsworth, vertical triple-expansion steam engine, one shaft.

< reference http://www.navsource.org/archives/11/02010.htm >

Alan Blencowe
alan@alanblencowe.com - www.alanblencowe.com

We hope to gather valid information to cross reference our material. However, we cannot change the existing Science Service caption, though we can include corrections, comments and sources for expanding the information on our image presentation.

Thank You! Science Service Historical Image Collection Webmaster



Comment 2.22.2000
1 Great site. As a museum director, I'm looking forward to making use of your images. However, the caption for Image DC 247 8061 E&MP 12.040 may be incorrect. The caption states the ship pictured is the "USS Heron, a converted minesweeper" but I think the photo shows either the USS WASP or USS HORNET. Both were capital ships and not converted minesweepers.

Thanks again, Doug Buchanan Stanly County Museum Albemarle, North Carolina

We hope to gather valid information to cross reference our material. However, we cannot change the existing Science Service caption, though we can include corrections, comments and sources for expanding the information on our image presentation.

Thank You! Science Service Historical Image Collection Webmaster

Comment 2.23.2000
1 With regards to the picture of the U.S.S Heron: I belive that Mr.Buchanan is correct in assuming the ship pictured is the Hornet. However, there is no possibility that the ship is the Wasp because the Wasp was an Essex class fleet carrier commisioned in 1943 (one year after the date given for the photo).

Smithsonian Intern - David Georgen, University of Virginia.

Comment 2.25.2000
1 I think you're right; the photo is of USS HORNET (CV-8) went down off Santa Cruz nine months after your photo was made (26 October 1942). Your intern is right about the photo not being the more modern Essex-class WASP (CV-18); I was thinking, though, of the first carrier WASP (CV-7), built in 1936 and sunk at Guadalcanal in 1943.

Best wishes from the Tarheel State, Doug Buchanan



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