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no date - With the electric furnace, it is possible to obtain the intense heat required to melt the elements that must be alloyed with the steel to give it corrosion resistance and other beneficial properties

OUT OF THE FIREY FURNACE

E&MP19.004

Electric Furnaces

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One of the basic tools in the production of stainless steel and a host of other useful high-quality alloy steels is the electric-arc furnace, shown here being charged with ferro-alloys (above) and during pouring (right).

Out of the Fiery Furnace
Tailor-made Alloy Steels Emerge
From Steelmen's "Crucibles"

It was in 1800 that the famous British scientist, Sir Humphry Davy, produced the first arc light between two carbon points, while he was experimenting with the newly developed electric battery. His discovery was essentially the first step in the evolution of the electric-arc furnace, which has made possible large-scale production of the fine alloy steels that are the backbone of modern industry.


Stainless steel, for instance - the uses of which are featured in ELECTROMET REVIEW - is manufactured in electric furnaces similar to the one illustrated on the reverse. Stainless and other quality steels are made by adding special alloys such as chromium, nickel, manganese, silicon,columbium, tungsten, and vanadium to a molten "bath" of carbon steel. Electro Metallurgical Company furnishes all these alloys except nickel.


With the electric furnace, it is possible to obtain the intense heat required to melt the elements that must be alloyed with the steel to give it corrosion resistance and other beneficial properties. The temperature that is attained in the arc, which plays between the electrodes and the molten steel, is around 6,000 degrees Fahrenheit. The heat is so great that it is hard to imagine, particularly when we consider that at a temperature of less than 3,000 degrees Fahrenheit steel is liquid and flows like water


ELECTROMET REVIEW
The purpose of Electromet Review is to bring to you "News and Views of Alloy Steels and Irons" in an interesting and quickly readable form. Electromet Review is mailed without charge to interested executives. If you would like others within your organization to receive Electromet Review, simply send their names and addresses to:

ELECTROMET REVIEW
ELECTRO METALLURGICAL COMPANY
Unit of Union Carbide and Carbon Corporation
30 East 42nd Street, UCC New York 17, N. Y.

In Canada: Electro Metallurgical Company of Canada, Limited, Welland, Ontario


Original Caption by Science Service
Electro Metallurgical Company [poster]



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