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1943 - RADIO TRANSFORMER CORE - a workman is cutting Hipersil strip into ribbons of various widths to be wound into cores which are impregnated with a plastic compound and baked

RADIO TRANSFORMER CORE - FEATHERWEIGHT TRANSFORMER CORE DESIGNED FOR WAR DUTY

E&MP 40.016

Electric Transformers

May 25, 1943

SHARON, Pa. -- Half the nickel and 10 per cent of the copper formerly required is saved by a featherweight, compact radio transformer core designed for war communications duty by the Westinghouse Transformer Division in Sharon, Pa.

The material conservation, on top of a 30 to 50 per cent saving in weight, was accomplished by reconstructing the core and using Hipersil steel, a highly magnetic silicon steel which requires less encircling copper wire and eliminates the use of nickel and the slow hand work formerly required.

Here a workman is cutting Hipersil strip into ribbons of various widths to be wound into cores which are impregnated with a plastic compound and baked.

The tiny cores, some of which are half the size of a man's little finger, are used in portable "walkie-talkie" field radios and for communications equipment in tanks, airplanes and submarines, where space is at a premium.

Photo ##66095 and 283042


Original Caption by Science Service
© Westinghouse



National Museum of American History

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