a website collaboration between Science Service and the Smithsonian Institution

ca. 1948 - WINDING WIRE FOR A TRANSFORMER - Hipersil - the new kind of steel sheet that can carry one third more magnetic flux, or magnetism than ordinary silicon steel- less copper wire is required in these transformers

WINDING WIRE FOR A TRANSFORMER-LESS COPPER

E&MP 40.029

Electric Transformers

ca. 1948

This girl at the Westinghouse Transformer Division, Sharon, Pa., is winding a coil of fine copper wire for a transformer of the type that is hung on poles in residential districts.

Since Westinghouse started making transformer cores of Hipersil -- the new kind of steel sheet that can carry one third more magnetic flux, or "magnetism" than ordinary silicon steel -- less copper wire is required in these transformers.

Thus the Company expects to save enough copper each year to make brass jackets for about 400 million 30-caliber army rifle shells.

Photo ## 269466


Original Caption by Science Service
© Westinghouse

Additional Information:

The Springfield M1903 (more formally the United States Rifle, Caliber .30, Model 1903) is an American magazine-fed, bolt-action rifle used primarily during the first half of the 20th century.

It was officially adopted as a service rifle on June 19th 1903, and was officially replaced as a service rifle by the faster-firing, semi-automatic M1 Garand, starting in 1936.

The M1903 saw notable use in World War I and World War II, and some cases in Vietnam.

It was also used as a sniper rifle in WWII, Korea and Vietnam. Furthermore, it remains in use as a civilian firearm and among some drill teams into the 21st century.



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