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1946 - LOOP ANTENNA WIRE - small-diameter, polyethylene insulated wire for the winding of loop antennas for home radio receivers has been developed by Federal Telephone and Radio Corporation

LOOP ANTENNA WIRE WITH HIGH "Q" FACTOR IS DEVELOPED BY FEDERAL TELEPHONE AND RADIO

E&MP 41.001

Electric Wire

December 6, 1946

A small-diameter, polyethylene insulated wire for the winding of loop antennas for home radio receivers has been developed by Federal Telephone and Radio Corporation, Newark, N. J., manufacturing associate of International Telephone and Telegraph Corporation.

Identified as K-1044, the wire is constructed of bare soft copper #24 AWG.

The size of the Conductor is .0201 inches, and the overall diameter only .038 inches.

A radio receiver equipped with Federal's K-1044 gains additional sensitivity and selectivity.

Electrical losses at radio frequencies are extremely low.

The "Q" factor of an average size loop - six inches by nine inches - reaches, and often exceeds, 200.

Treatment of the wire with polyethylene makes it possible to design a coil without support.

The wire is wound and heated between plates.

When the polyethylene begins to melt, the coil is removed and the polyethylene on re-hardening provides the necessary rigidity.

Since the material used in coil supports introduces added electrical losses, the "Q" factor of receivers using the K-1044 is further increased.

Polyethylene insulated wire is highly resistant to water, acids, alkalies [sic], and oils thus insuring efficient receiver operation under all atmospheric conditions.


Original Caption by Science Service
© Federal Telephone and Radio Corporation



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