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1933 - Miss Joan Eccles & Dr. E. C. Creutz demonstrate the 200 million volt synchro-cyclotron or atom smasher

SYNCHRO-CYCLOTRON

CD 1967022 E&MP47.005

Electromagnets

1933

FIGURE 1  Force of a 1000 ampere electromagnet at Carnegie Tech supports a heavy wrench against the hand of Miss Joan Eccles of Edgewood, Pa.

The magnet is a 1/14 scale working model of its giant counterpart which will form an important element in Tech’s proposed 200 million volt synchro-cyclotron.

Estimated cost of the Carnegie Tech atom smasher is one million dollars, toward which support in the amount of $580,000 has been received from the Buhl Foundation of Pittsburgh, the U.S. Office of Naval Research, and the Westinghouse Electric Corporation.

FIGURE 2  Dr. E. C. Creutz of Carnegie Institute of Technology uses a search coil to measure the magnetic field of a 1000 ampere, 1/14 scale working model of the electromagnet which will form an important part of Carnegie’s 200 million volt synchro-cyclotron.

Support for the project totaling #580,000 from the Buhl Foundation of Pittsburgh, the U.S. Office of Naval Research, and Westinghouse Electric Corporation has been received by Carnegie.

Estimated cost of the atom smasher is $1,000,000.

FIGURE 3  Force of a 1000-ampere electromagnet at Carnegie Tech supports a two-pound hammer against the hand of Miss Joan Eccles, of Edgewood, Pa.

The magnet is a 1/14 scale working model of its giant counterpart which will form an important element in Tech’s proposed 200 million volt synchro-cyclotron.

Estimated cost of the Carnegie Tech atom smasher is one million dollars toward which support in the amount of $580,000 has been received from the Buhl Foundation of Pittsburgh, the U.S. Office of Naval Research, and the Westinghouse Electric Corporation.

FIGURE 4  Joan Eccles of Edgewood, Pa., gets a kick out of the miniature man who is dwarfed by a 1/14 scale electromagnet at Carnegie Tech.

The little wooden figure shows how a real person would look beside the actual full-scale magnet of which the apparatus pictured is a 1000 ampere working model.

The giant magnet will form an important part of Tech’s 200 million volt synchro-cyclotron.

Carnegie has received support for the project totaling $580,000 from the Buhl Foundation of Pittsburgh, the U.S. Office of Naval Research, and the Westinghouse Electric Corporation. Estimated cost of Tech’s atom smasher is $1,000,000. 


Original Caption by Science Service
©Carnegie Institute of Technology



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