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1958 - left to right, Dr. G.K. Hartmann, technical director of the Naval Ordnance Laboratory; Jan Forman, inventor of the Orbitron and director of special projects for Adalia, Ltd., of Montreal; Dr. Foote; Captain W.W. Wilbourne, NOL commander; and J.A. Richards, president of Adalia, Ltd

ORBITRON

E&MP52.011
E&MP51.002

Electronics

February 21, 1958

Dr. Paul D. Foote (third from left), Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering, headed a group of DOD scientists and engineers on a recent visit to the Naval Ordnance Laboratory in Sliver Spring, Md., for a demonstration of the "Orbitron".

This new electron tube detector-converter, which is now being studied by the Laboratory for the Defense Department, may have many important uses in guided missiles, Sea mines and other military applications.

Various types of Orbitrons, it is claimed, can be used to measure magnetic fields, convert light or heat into electrical energy, and serve a s frequency modulators in electronic systems.

From left to right in photo are Dr. G. K. Hartmann, technical director of the Naval Ordnance Laboratory; Jan Forman, inventor of the Orbitron and director of special projects for Adalia, Ltd., of Montreal; Dr. Foote; Captain W. W. Wilbourne, NOL commander; and J. A. Richards, president of Adalia, Ltd.

This company, whose board chairman is Sir Robert Watson-Watt, one of the inventors of radar, has collaborated with Spartan Air Services, Ltd., of Ottawa in developing the Orbitron.

Released by Defense Department 2/21/58

Original Caption by Science Service
U. S. NAVAL ORDNANCE LABORATORY WHITE OAK - Silver Spring, Maryland



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