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1967 - hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell system housed in a cylindrical pressure vessel has an average power rating of 1.2 kw at from 25 to 28 volts d.c., with an intermittent duty rating of 2.7 kw

'CANNED' FUEL CELL FOR UNDERSEA POWER DESIGNED BY UNION CARBIDE

E&MP59.004

Fuel Cells

October 16, 1967

PARMA, Ohio - If you're planning to explore the continental shelf, you might want to take along a compact fuel cell power supply designed here by Union Carbide Corporation's Electronics Division.

The unit can operate at ocean depths up to 850 feet, supplying electric power for heat and light such as shown in the above [right] model. Generators of this kind could supply inflatable structures that might be used as "lounges" in which divers could periodically relieve the tensions and traumas of undersea missions.

According to William C. Thurber, fuel cell marketing manager, the undersea power supply incorporates engineering features such as fuel cell stacks, pumps, and gas circulators that have been previously proven out on other fuel cell systems. "We have taken existing technology as a point of departure, and adapted it to undersea environment," Mr. Thurber said.

The hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell system housed in a cylindrical pressure vessel has an average power rating of 1.2 kw at from 25 to 28 volts d.c., with an intermittent duty rating of 2.7 kw. Heat removal is by convection to sea water. This particular system has an energy storage of 28,300 watt-hours.

According to Mr. Thurber, systems as large as 100 kw are technically feasible for undersea application. Before you go diving, write to him at P.O. Box 6116, Cleveland, Ohio 44101.


Original Caption by Science Service
Union Carbide



National Museum of American History

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