a website collaboration between Science Service and the Smithsonian Institution

Views inside the large test chamber show the polyurethane anechoic material collapsed and drawn up on the left and extended on the right

LARGE TEST CHAMBER

E&MP 90.010

Noise Control

no date

FOAM - Views inside the large test chamber show the polyurethane anechoic material collapsed and drawn up on the left and extended on the right.

The large black space in the rear wall is the scheduled location of 25 low frequency sirens (now being manufactured).

The single siren on the right is a prototype broad band siren being developed for possible future use in the facility.

Tests show that the Scott "open pore" polyurethane foam will absorb 96 per cent of the high intensity sound striking it.

The material has no membranes connecting its skeletal strands, thus permitting air to circulate freely through the thousands of interior pores.

Sound carried by the air will be absorbed within the six layers of foam.

Total space occupied by the foam layers and intervening air spaces is almost seven feet.

For: Foam Division Scott Paper Company From: Ketchum, MacLeod & Grove, Inc. Four Gateway Center - Pittsburgh, Pa. 15222 A. C. Croft - Phone: 261-5100


Original Caption by Science Service



National Museum of American History

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