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1933 - PICTURES BY RADIO - Kilgore on the roof of Westinghouse's East Pittsburgh research facility as he tried out the transmitter of the World's Fair setup in the spring of 1933

ULTRA SHORT WAVE RADIO

E&MP 96.013

Phototelegraphy

ca. 1932

Receiving apparatus for ultra-short wave radio transmission ultra-short wave radio beams have many of the properties of light and may be focused by suitable mirrors.

[This] Photo shows receiving apparatus with receiving element at focus of mirror.

The system will have usefulness in secret communication as in warfare for only receivers in path of beam can pick up the signal. And it is not affected by static or fading of signal strength. System of Westinghouse Elec. Co.

PHOTO: ## 217593


For the Westinghouse exhibit in the Electrical Building of Chicago's Century of Progress Exposition, which opened in May 1933, Mouromtseff's team assembled a complete one-way microwave communications system.

They procured two-foot reflector mirrors from Westinghouse's searchlight division and put together what appears to be the first publicly exhibited microwave-dish communications link in the United States.

Kilgore on the roof of Westinghouse's East Pittsburgh research facility as he tried out the transmitter of the World's Fair setup in the spring of 1933. Although the system could transmit a mile or more, the World's Fair demonstration probably spanned a shorter distance so that spectators could view both the transmitter and receiver at the same time and note the path of the light-like invisible microwave beam as it bounced off a metallic reflector from one dish to the other.


also see image 96.029 within this archive collection


Original Caption by Science Service w/additional support by The Society for the History of Technology, The George Washington University
© Radio Pictures Laboratory Washington D.C. and Westinghouse Electric Company



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