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1942 - WIRE BURNED IN POWER LINE TEST - the switch was thrown and 110,000 volts went pulsing through the circuit, the fuse wire burst into flame and 1000 amperes jumped the gap with a roar

WIRE BURNED IN POWER LINE TEST

E&MP 101.001

Power Transmission

April 24, 1942

The flash in this picture was bright enough to have been seen five miles and the accompanying roar was heard for half a mile away.

Yet the whole thing was caused by the deliberate burning of a wire.

It is a picture made some time ago at Leadville, Colorado, during the testing of a 150-mile power line of the Public Service Company of Colorado.

A General Electric six unit Hewlett Insulator string had been hooked into the circuit and the line conductor grounded by means of a piece of fuse wire.

When the switch was thrown and 110,000 volts went pulsing through the circuit, the fuse wire burst into flame and 1000 amperes jumped the gap with a roar.

Fifteen watchmen were stationed at 10-mile intervals to watch for similar outbreaks, the indication of weak spots, along the line.


Original Caption by Science Service
© General Electric company



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