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1962 - AIR DEFENSE COMMAND -  During the 1950's, thousands of Americans supplemented radars as members 
            of ADC's Ground Observer Corps, page 10 of 14

AIR DEFENSE COMMAND - PAMPHLET

E&MP 103.010L

Radar

June - October 1962

[page 10]

THE PAST

During World War II it became apparent that the ocean barriers which had protected the continental United States against attack in past years would no longer suffice against the new bombers which the war had produced.

Consequently, in March 1946, an Air Defense Command was created and given the mission of defending the U.S. against air attack.

Several years went by, however, before even a token system could be erected.

By 1950, national complacency had given way before the news of Soviet possession of the atomic bomb, the intensification of the Cold War and the outbreak of fighting in Korea.

A modern radar network was begun and new all-weather interceptors were added to our air defenses.

In 1951, ADC headquarters was located at Colorado Springs to supervise a build-up in air defense.

Three years later, ADC joined with its Army and Navy counterparts under a new U.S. Continental Air Defense Command (CONAD).

In 1957, all these organizations merged wit the Canadian RCAF to form NORAD.

Today, ADC is the U.S. Air Force's primary agency in aerospace defense matters and the major component of the continent's international air defense effort.

Photo caption upper right:
During the 1950's, thousands of Americans supplemented radars as members of ADC's Ground Observer Corps.

Photo caption lower right:
Manual combat centers of earlier days gave way to SAGE's electronic data processing.

Filed by Science Service
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