a website collaboration between Science Service and the Smithsonian Institution

1946 - Lynn Ulman checks receiver-indicator of the first major installation for use on a long distance passenger-carrying marine service

RADAR USE IN PEACE

E&MP 103.017

Radar - Equipment

February 18, 1946

WAR-BORN RADAR TO PROTECT CHESAPEAKE BOATS

Baltimore, Feb. 18 -- Turning radar -- magic secret weapon of World War II -- to peacetime usefulness, Westinghouse Engineer Lynn Ulman checks receiver-indicator of the first major installation for use on a long distance passenger-carrying marine service.

Now being installed on the Old Bay Line's Baltimore-Norfolk night boat, City of Richmond, this unit will provide navigational assistance and anti-collision protection for from 100 yards to 32 miles of the ship.

Observations will be made in the disc-like viewer (top) of this receiver-indicator console located on the bridge. Water surfaces will be dark while any obstruction -- ship, buoy, shoreline, etc. -- will be indicated in a bright fluorescent pattern.

Ships will be shown graphically while shorelines will appear as on a map.

IEP 127

Original Caption by Science Service
© 
Westinghouse Electric Corporation



National Museum of American History

Home

Search - Site Map - Subjects to Choose From - Numbering Format

Credits - Copyright - Comments