a website collaboration between Science Service and the Smithsonian Institution

1946 - records are used to study the amount radio waves are absorbed by the ionosphere

RECEIVING SIGNALS FROM OVERSEAS

E&MP 103.027

Radar

February 1946

Intensities of broadcasts picked up from ten test stations in such distant places as England, Honolulu, Africa and Chile are continually recorded (picture) at the Sterling, Va., Radio Receiving Station of the National Bureau of Standards.

These records are used to study the amount radio waves are absorbed by the ionosphere.

Tubes used in sending radio impulses into the ionosphere to determine the height of the layer from which the waves will bounce back to earth [were shown in the SNL article].

Sunspots can be expected to cause a blackout of shortwave radio broadcasts.

The largest sunspot observed by the U. S. Naval Observatory is about fifteen times as large as the earth.

7178

Original Caption by Science Service
©  National Bureau of Standards NBS (renamed 1988: National Institute of Standards and Technology NIST)



National Museum of American History

Home

Search - Site Map - Subjects to Choose From - Numbering Format

Credits - Copyright - Comments

 

>