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1945 - radar's electronic eye is marked down on a vertical chart in the radar plot room of an ESSEX-class carrier during strikes against the Japs earlier in 1945

SILENT WEAPON OF WORLD WAR 2

E&MP 103.051

Radar - Electronics

November 24, 1945

An electronic 'eye' apparently developed independently by U.S., British, French and German scientists in the 1930s, radar owes much of its rapid growth to the advent of war.

First used in detection of surface objects in the near-distance under conditions of poor visibility, radar's range and versatility were quickly extended to provide long-range detection of airborne as well as surface objects, accuracy in fire-control, safety in navigation and identification of distant or unrecognizable planes and ships.

To radar goes much of the credit for England's doughty defense in the dark days of the 'blitz'; and as our forces grind closer to Journey's End in Tokyo, much of the credit for 'lighting the road' goes also to radar, the silent weapon of World War 2.

Information provided by radar's electronic eye is marked down on a vertical chart in the radar plot room of an ESSEX-class carrier during strikes against the Japs earlier in 1945.

Behind the transparent expanse of the giant circle, other enlisted men work on other aspects of the incoming flow of information.

Original Caption by Science Service
© Official US Navy Photograph

Additional Information

1945 Publication - SILENT WEAPON OF WORLD WAR 2

. . . Pioneer workers in radar, Dr. A. Hoyt Taylor (right), Chief Consultant and Chief Coordinator of Electronics at Naval Research Laboratory, Anacostia, D.C., and his long-time associate, Leo C. Young reminisce over the "scope" of radar's history beside the first radar set at the Research Laboratory. Few men know the history better. In 1922, while experimenting with communications equipment for the Navy, they made the initial discovery of distortion in radio reception caused by the intrusion of objects between transmitter and receiver. Working from this discovery, the two men and a number of associates and assistants made giant strides forward into the vast sphere of scientific fields covered by the word "radar" today. The equipment in the background, crude and elementary in comparison with the sets of today, was a breathtaking innovation when first used in 1937 . . .

Courtesy: Radio News
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