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after World War II - Dr. John L. Sheldon and Dr. W.W. Shaver discuss studs used to support the heavy color screen assembly at the viewing end of the glass funnel of every color TV tube

STUDS FOR COLOR TV TUBES

CD 1967062 E&MP134.267

Television

after World War II

Dr. John L. Sheldon, manager of Product Development in the Glass Applications Laboratory at Corning Glass Works (standing) is pointing to on of the studs used to support the heavy color screen assembly at the viewing end of the glass funnel of every color TV tube.

Nelson stud welding guns, like those which saved shipbuilders an estimated 100 million man-hours during World War II, are used to install the studs on the thin metal flange which is first fused to the glass.

Dr. W.W. Shaver, director of Product Development, is shown holding the face plate which protects the screen. 


Original Caption by Science Service
Corning Glass Works



National Museum of American History

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