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©David J. Rhees, Chapel Hill - 1979
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FOOTNOTES


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1.

Charles C. Gillispie, The Edge of Objectivity. an Essay in the History of Ideas (Princeton, N.J.:Princeton University Press, 1960), pp. 155-156(back to text)

2.

Quoted in Daniel J. Kevles, The Physicists: The History of a Scientific Community in America New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1978), p. 110. (back to text)

3.

David Dietz, "Science, Newspapers and the Future," Quill 54 (July 1966): 12.(back to text)

4.

Ronald C. Tobey, The American Ideology of National Science, 1919-1930 (Pittsburgh: University or Pittsburgh Press, 1971), pp. 3-12.(back to text)

5.

Kevles, pp. 14-17.(back to text)

6.

Frank Luther Mott, A History of American Magazines, 4 vols. (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1939-57), 3:105.(back to text)

7.

Kevles, pp. 14-17.(back to text)

8.

Ibid.; Mott, 3:108, 495-496.(back to text)

9.

Tobey, p. 10.(back to text)

10.

George Daniels, American Science in the Age of Jackson (New York: Columbia University Press, 1968), pp. 40-41. (back to text)

11.

Daniel J. Kevles, "George Ellery Hale, the First World War and the Advancement of Science in America," Isis 59 (1968):428. (back to text)

12.

Quoted in Kevles, The Physicists, p. 98. (back to text)

13.

Edwin E. Slosson, "Science and Journalism: The Opportunity and the Need for Writers of Popular Science," Independent 74 (April 24, 1913):915. (back to text)

14.

Dietz, p. 12. (back to text)

15.

Tobey, pp. 62-65. (back to text)

16.

James McKeen Cattell, "The Scientific Monthly and the Popular Science Monthly," Popular Science Monthly 87 (September 1915):307. (back to text)

17.

See Tobey's chapter, "The Awakening of the Scientists, 1916-1920," pp. 20-61. (back to text)

18.

Quoted in Robert Kargon, ed., The Maturing of American Science (Washington, D.C.: American Association for the Advancement of Science, 1974), p. 1. (back to text)

19.

Ibid., p. 3. (back to text)

20.

Tobey, pp. 65, 341. Kevles, pp. 109-116, 139-141. (back to text)

21.

Quoted in Kevles, p. 110. (back to text)

22.

Quoted in Kargon, p. 19. (back to text)

23.

Tobey, p. xiii.(back to text)

24.

Tobey, pp. xiii, 12-19; Henry F. May, The End of American Innocence: A Study of the First Years of Our Time, 1912-1917 (1959; reprint ed., Chicago: Quadrangle Books, 1964), pp. 317, 361-362, 393-398. (back to text)

25.

Robert Millikan, "Science and Modern Life," Atlantic 141 (April 1928):490. (back to text)

26.

Ibid., p. 493. (back to text)

27.

May, p. 223. (back to text)

28.

Frederick J. Hoffman, The Twenties: American Writing in the Postwar Decade (1949; reprinted., New York: Free Press, 1965), pp. 322-323.(back to text)

29.

Robert Millikan, New opportunity in Science," Science 50 (September 26, 1919):292.(back to text)

30.

Dietz, p. 12; Dietz reportedly owed his job as first science editor on an American newspaper (the Cleveland Press in 1921) to his success in editing a "radio page." Max Coe, "David Dietz, Science Editor of the Cleveland Press," Scripps-Howard News, January 1929, pp. 26-27.(back to text)

31.

Frederick Lewis Allen, Only Yesterday, An Informal History of the Twenties (1931; reprint ed., New York and Evanston, 1ll.: Harper and Row, 1964), pp. 164-165. (back to text)

32.

Ibid. (back to text)

33.

George Basalla, Robert Kargon, William Coleman, eds., Victorian Science (Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1970) pp. 17-20. Basalla, Kargon and Coleman use the term cult of science" only in reference to the 1870s and 1880s in Britain, but conditions in postwar America seem quite comparable.(back to text)

34.

See Fig. 2 in President's Research Committee on Social Trends, Recent Social Trends in the United States (New York: McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1934), p. 391.(back to text)

35.

Allen, pp. 164-165.(back to text)

36.

James Steel Smith, "The Day of the Popularizers," South Atlantic Quarterly 62 (Spring 1963), pp. 297-298. The reception of what some regarded as "get-wise-quick" schemes was not totally favorable. In 1923, for example, a parody of the outlines appeared entitled The Outline of Everything. Hoffman, pp. 310-311.(back to text)

37.

Smith. pp. 298-301.(back to text)

38.

Silas Bent, Ballyhoo, The Voice of the Press (New York: Boni and Liveright, 1927), p. 23.(back to text)

39.

The report is summarized in Benjamin Gruenberg, Science and the Public Mind (New York: McGraw-Hill Book Co., Inc., 1935), pp. 93, 135.(back to text)

40.

Will Durant, The Story of Philosophy. The Lives and the Opinions of the Great Philosophers (1926; reprint ed., New York: Washington Square Press, 1961), p. vii. (back to text)

41.

Tobey, p. 65.(back to text)

42.

Science Service, Inc., Corporate Records, 1927-30, Washington, D.C., p. 288. (back to text)

43.

Tobey, pp. 66-68. (back to text)

44.

Ibid., pp. 66-71.(back to text)

45.

Ibid.; Slosson, "Notes of a Talk to Trustees of Science Service at the Meeting of June 17, 1921," Science Service Records, Record Unit 7091, Smithsonian Archives, Washington, D.C., Box 14, "Science Service Organization" folder; Slosson, "Memorandum in regard to a popular science periodical," October 26, 1925, Science Service, Inc., Corporate Records, 1921-27, pp. 215-216.(back to text)

46.

Charles R. McCabe, ed., Damned Old Crank, A Portrait of E. W. Scripps (New York: Harper and Bros., 1951), pp. vii-xvii, 1-12, 28-40, 232; Kevles, p. 171.(back to text)

47.

William E. Ritter to E. W. Scripps, May 13, 1921, Science Service Records, Box 19, "Science Service Organization" folder, p. 9.(back to text)

48.

Ibid., pp. 5-6.(back to text)

49.

A Statement of Purpose," Science News-Letter, August 11, 1928, p. 90.(back to text)

50.

William E. Ritter, "Replies of Trustees on Director's Proposals," n.d., Science Service Records, Box 19, "Trustees' Letters" folder, p. 3.(back to text)

51.

McCabe, pp. xiv-xv, 10-11, 231.(back to text)

52.

Ibid., pp. 232-233.(back to text)

53.

Ibid., p. 231.(back to text)

54.

Science Service, Inc., Corporate Records, 1921-27, Washington, D.C., pp. 380, 385.(back to text)

55.

Slosson had a heart condition and the pressures of his new responsibilities may have shortened his life, according to his son, Preston, a prominent historian. Preston William Slosson, "Edwin E. Slosson, Pioneer," in Edwin E. Slosson, A Number of Things (New York: Harcourt and Brace, 1930), p. 24; Dictionary of American Biography, 1936 ed., s.v. "Slosson, Edwin Emery," by Harrison E. Howe.(back to text)

56.

Hamilton Holt, "Edwin E. Slosson," Book League Monthly 3 (December 1929):182.(back to text)

57.

Daniel J. Kevles, The Physicists: The History of a Scientific Community in America (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1978), p. 172; Slosson, "Notes of Talk to Trustees of Science Service by Edwin E. Slosson at the Annual Meeting, April 27, 1922," Science Service Records, Record Unit 7091, Smithsonian Archives, Washington, D.C., Box 43, "Dr. Slosson" folder, pp. 8-9; Science Service, Inc., Corporate Records, 1921-27, p. 138.(back to text)

58.

Slosson, "Notes of a Talk to Trustees of Science Service at the Meeting of June 17, 1921," Science Service Records, Box 14, "Science Service Organization" folder, pp. 2-3.(back to text)

59.

Science News-Letter, February 12, 1929, p. 106.(back to text)

60.

Slosson. "Notes of a Talk to Trustees . . . June 17, 1921," pp. 2-5.(back to text)

61.

Ibid., p. 5. (back to text)

62.

Slosson. "Annual Address of the Director of Science Service at Meeting of the Board of Trustees, Washington, April 25, 1929," Science Service, Inc., Corporate Records, 1927-30, p. 551. (back to text)

63.

Howard Wheeler, "Report of Manager of Science Service," n.d., Science Service Records, Box 14, "Science Service Organization" folder, pp. 6-7. (back to text)

64.

Slosson, "Notes of Talk to Trustees . . . April 27, 1922," pp. 5-6. (back to text)

65.

See quotations and discussion in "Report of the Annual Meeting of the Board of Trustees, Science Service, May 1, 1930, by Watson Davis, Managing Editor," Science Service, Inc., Corporate Records, 1927-30, pp. 634-635. (back to text)

66.

Slosson, "Annual Address of the Director . . . April 25, 1929," p. 551. Silas Bent offers several examples of the propaganda "puffs" of the twenties, such-such as the campaign against bobbed hair conducted by a net manufacturer, in Ballyhoo, The Voice of the Press (New York: Boni and Liveright, 1927), p. 139. (back to text)

67.

Science Service, Inc., Corporate Records, 1927-30, p. 380. (back to text)

68.

Biographical resume, Science Service Records, Box 20, "Watson Davis" folder. (back to text)

69.

David Dietz has traditionally been given credit as first American newsman to take the title of Science Editor (in 1921). Several sources, however, indicate Watson Davis became "science editor" of the Washington Herald in 1920. Although this position may only have been part-time, since he continued working for the Bureau of Standards until 1921, Davis may well deserve priority in this distinction. "Watson Davis: 1896-1967," Science News, July 8, 1967, p. 28; American Men of Science, 1927 ed., s.v. "Davis, Watson"; World Who's Who in Science, s.v. "Davis, Watson." (back to text)

70.

William E. Ritter to E. W. Scripps, May 13, 1921, Science Service Records, Box 19, "Science Service Organization" folder, p. 4. (back to text)

71.

Howard Wheeler, "Report of Manager," pp. 1-5; Idem, "Report of the Business Manager, Meeting of the Board of Trustees, Washington, D.C., April 27, 1922," Science Service Records, Box 42, "Howard Wheeler Office File," pp. 1-4. (Draft.) (back to text)

72.

Slosson, Notes of Talk to Trustees . . . June 17, 1921," pp. 9-10. (back to text)

73.

It has retained the latter format, with minor variations, up to the present time, though the name was shortened to Science News in 1966. Science Service, Inc., Corporate Records, 1921-27, p. 71; Slosson, "Notes of Talk to Trustees . . . April 27, 1922," pp. 3-4. (back to text)

74.

Slosson, "Notes of Talk to Trustees . . . June 17, 1921," p. 16. (back to text)

75.

See especially the section of "Hostility Toward Science" in ibid., pp. 11-20. (back to text)

76.

Ibid., p. 14. (back to text)

77.

Ibid., p. 16. (back to text)

78.

Ibid., p. 14. (back to text)

79.

Ibid.., p. 13. (back to text)

80.

Ibid.. p. 15. (back to text)

81.

Slosson, "Adult Education in Science," in Digest of the Proceedings of the Second Annual Meeting, American Association for Adult Education, May 16 to 18, 1927 at Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, Ohio (New York: Bulletin of the American Association for Adult Education, 1927), p. 51. (back to text)

82.

Slosson, "Notes of Talk to Trustees . . . June 17, 1921," p. 17. (back to text)

83.

Ibid., pp. 13-14.(back to text)

84.

Ibid., pp. 21-22. (back to text)

85.

Science News-Letter, May 7, 1927, p. 300; Science News-Letter, July 21, 1928, p. 28. (back to text)

86.

Science News-Letter, November 5, 1927, p. 304. (back to text)

87.

Publicity pamphlet, n.d., Science Service Records, Box 41, filed under "W" in "1922 News-Letter Clients, folder. (back to text)

88.

Slosson, "Notes of Talk to Trustees . . . June 17, 1921," pp. 24-25. For those who desired portraits of their "heroes," Science Service offered photographs of over two thousand scientists. Science News-Letter, March 19, 1927, p. 178. (back to text)

89.

Ibid., pp. 22-23. (back to text)

90.

Ibid. (back to text)

91.

"Classics of Science," edited by Helen Miles Davis (Watson Davis' wife), consisted of excerpts from classic texts and reprints of famous experiments. (back to text)

92.

Janet M. Howard, "Survey of Utilization of Daily Science News Bulletin Covering Mailing Period Feb. 12-Mar. 19, 1927," Science Service Records, Box 29, folder marked "Material For General Talks on Current Science - WD." (back to text)

93.

Quoted in Holt, p. 184. (back to text)

94.

Slosson, Chats on Science (New York: Century Co., 1924), p. 169. (back to text)

95.

Davis, ed., The Advance of Science (Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, Doran, and Co., 1934), p. 374. (back to text)

96.

Quoted in Kevles, p. 173. (back to text)

97.

The New Frontiersmen," quoted in Science 57 (February 9, 1923):176-177. (back to text)

98.

Slosson. Chats, p. .169. (back to text)

99.

James Steel Smith notes that many books of popularized knowledge of the twenties used episodes and personalities for drama, but were essentially factual and unsensational. "The Day of the Popularizers: ' The 1920's," South Atlantic Quarterly 62 (Spring 1963):305-309. (back to text)

100.

Science Service, Inc., Corporate Records, 1927-30, pp. 471, 475. (back to text)

101.

Ibid., pp. 468, 550. (back to text)

102.

Ibid., p. 468. (back to text)

103.  

Ibid., pp. 477, 480, 557, 565-566, 569, 636-639, 642. (back to text)

104.

Ibid., pp. 468-469, 638. (back to text)

105.

Ibid., pp. 385-402. (back to text)

106.

Publicity pamphlet, Science Service Records: Davis, "Stories to Be Careful Of," fifth ed., February 23, 1933, Science Service Records, Box 29, folder marked "Material for General Talks on Science - WD." (back to text)

107.

Slosson, "Don'ts for Would-Be Writers of Science," reprinted in "Hints for Writing Science," Science News-Letter, July 1, 1950, p. 12. (back to text)

108.

[Davis], "About Writing for Science Service," in "Hints for Writing Science," Science News-Letter, July 1, 1950, p. 13. (back to text)

109.

Ibid. (back to text)

110.

American Men of Science, 1933 ed., s.v. "Thone, Frank." (back to text)

111.

American Men of Science, 1944 ed., s.v. "Stokely, James"; Science Service, Inc., Corporate Records, 1921-27, p. 184. (back to text)

112.

Memorandum from Watson Davis to Executive Committee, June 1, 1928, Science Service Records, Box 8. (back to text)

113.

Science Service, Inc., Corporate Records, 1927-30, p. 552. (back to text)

114.

Ibid., pp. 551-552. (back to text)

115.

As an example, Slosson cited the New York Herald Tribune which, in 1929, rushed into print a front-page translation of Einstein's paper on unified field theory, mathematical formulas and all. Ibid., p. 552. (back to text)

116.

Ibid., p. 636. (back to text)

117.

E. W. Scripps, "Highbrow Scientists and the Ignorant Public" in Charles R. McCabe, ed., Damned Old Crank, A Self-Portrait of E. W. Scripps (New York: Harper and Bros. Publishing, 1951), p.236. (back to text)

118.

Dictionary of American Biography, 1936 ed., s.v. "Slosson, Edwin." (back to text)

119.

New York Times, n.s., October 21, 1929, sec. 3, p. 4. (back to text)

120.

Hamilton Holt, "Edwin E. Slosson," Book League Monthly, December 1929, p. 182. (back to text)

121.

Paul Carter, Another Part of the Twenties (New York: Columbia University Press, 1977), p. 74.(back to text)

122.

As there is no biography of Slosson, the best source of biographical details is in Preston W. Slosson, "Editor's Foreword" and "Edwin E. Slosson, Pioneer" in Edwin Slosson, A Number of Things (New York: Harcourt, 1930), pp. ix, 3-33. See also Dictionary of American Biography, 1936 ed., s.v. "Slosson, Edwin"; Holt, "Edwin E. Slosson," pp. 179-184; and American Men of Science,1927 ed., s.v. ASlosson, Edwin.(back to text)

123.

Dictionary of American Biography, 1936 ed., s.v. "Slosson, Edwin"; Preston Slosson, "Edwin E. Slosson, Pioneer," pp. 7-9(back to text)

124.

Preston Slosson, "Edwin E. Slosson, Pioneer," pp. 10-14; "Notes on Edwin E. Slosson," n.s., n.d., Science Service Records, Record Unit 7091, Smithsonian Archives, Washington, D.C., Box 20, "E. E. Slosson Biography" folder; "Biographical Notes of Edwin E. Slosson," n.s., n.d., Science Service Records, Box 20, "Original Copy Bibliography" folder.(back to text)

125.

Holt, p. 183; Babbitt sold 253,000 copies. Daniel Kevles, The Physicists: The History of a Scientific Community in Modern America (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1978), p. 174(back to text)

126.

Quoted in Holt, p. 183.(back to text)

127.

Preston Slosson, "Edwin E. Slosson, Pioneer," pp. 24-25.(back to text)

128.

Dictionary of American Biography, 1936 ed., s.v. "Slosson, Edwin."(back to text)

129.

Kevles, p. 172; Edwin Slosson, Chats on Science (New York and London: Century Co., 1924), p. 123.; Slosson, Creative Chemistry, new ed., rev. and enl. by Harrison E. Howe (New York: D. Appleton-Century Co., 1938), p. 136(back to text)

130.

Quoted in Science News-Letter, October 26, 1929, p. 258.(back to text)

131.

Ronald Tobey, Science, The American Ideology of National Science 1919 -01930 (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1971), p. 71.(back to text)

132.

Dr. E. E. Slosson, Scientist, Dead," n.s., New York Times, October 16, 1929, p. 31.(back to text)

133.

Independent., December 29, 1910, pp. 1440- 1442(back to text)

134.

William E. Ritter to E. W. Scripps, May 13, 1921, Science Service Records, Box 19, "Science Service Organization" folder, p. 9.(back to text)

135.

Slosson, "Democracy of Knowledge," in Baker Brownell, ed., Preface to the Universe (New York: D. Van Nostrand Co., 1929), pp. 105-106.(back to text)

136.

Slosson. "Adult Education in Science" in Digest of the Proceedings of the Second Annual Meeting, American Association for Adult Education, May 16 to 18, 1927, at Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, Ohio (New York: Bulletin of the American Association of Adult Education, 1927), p. 50.(back to text)

137.

Archeology ranked second in the survey, botany third, while astronomy, zoology, sociology, and medicine ranked about even. The two most popular stories were "College Girls Have Best Physiques" and "Measure Heat of Biggest Volcano." Janet M. Howard, "Survey of Utilization of Daily Science News Bulletin Covering Mailing Period Feb. 12-Mar. 19 1927," Science Service Records, Box 29, folder marked material For General Talks on Current Science - WD." That psychology was the most popular science in the survey bears out Frederick Lewis Allen's assertion that psychology was "king" in the 1920s. Only Yesterday (1931; reprint ed., New York: Harper and Row, 1964), p. 165.(back to text)

138.

Slosson, "Science and Journalism: The Opportunity and the Need for Writers of Popular Science," Independent, April 24, 1913, p. 914.(back to text)

139.

Independent, November 28, 1925, p. 601.(back to text)

140.

Ibid.(back to text)

141.

Kevles, p. 175(back to text)

142.

Oscar Handlin, "Science and Technology in Popular Culture" in Gerald Holton, ed., Science and Culture (Boston, Mass.: Beacon Press, 1965), p. 190(back to text)

143.

Slosson, Creative Chemistry, pp. 14, 36-37, 151, 245(back to text)

144.

Slosson, Snapshots of Science (New York: Century Co., 1928), p. 91.(back to text)

145.

Slosson, Chats on Science, pp. 224-225(back to text)

146.

Slosson, Easy Lessons in Einstein (New York: Harcourt, Brace, and Co., Inc., 1920), p. 57(back to text)

147.

Slosson, Sermons of a Chemist (New York: Harcourt, Brace, and Co., Inc., 1925), p. 204.(back to text)

148.

Slosson, "Pragmatism," Independent, February 21, 1907, p. 423.(back to text)

149.

Slosson, "Democracy of Knowledge," pp. 123-124(back to text)

150.

Slosson, Creative Chemistry, pp. 105-106, 123(back to text)

151.

Tobey, American Ideology, pp. 74, 80.(back to text)

152.

Kevles, p. 184; Paul Carter, Another Part of the Twenties, pp. 80-83(back to text)

153.

Slosson, Chats on Science, p. 224.(back to text)

154.

Science News-Letter, May 7, 1927, p. 300(back to text)

155.

Slosson, "Gasoline as a World Power" in Otis W. Caldwell, Edwin Slosson, eds., Science Remaking the World (Garden City, N.Y.: Garden City Publishing Co., Inc., 1922), pp. 21-22.(back to text)

156.

Slosson, "Democracy of Knowledge," p. 126.(back to text)

157.

Slosson, "Science and Journalism," p. 917.(back to text)

158.

Tobey, pp. 81-89.(back to text)

159.

Tobey, p. 76.(back to text)

160.

The Edge of Objectivity, An Essay in the History of Ideas (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1960), p. 155.(back to text)

161.

Tobey, p. 231.(back to text)

162.

Leonard Marsak, "Bernard .de Fontenelle: In Defense of Science," in Leonard Marsak, ed., The Rise of Science in Relation to Society (New York: McMillan Co., 1964), p. 76.(back to text)

163.

Ibid., p. 69(back to text)

164.

Science News-Letter, August 11, 1928, p. 90.(back to text)

165.

Charles Rosenberg, "Science Technology, and Economic Growth: The Case of the Agricultural Experiment Station, 1875-1914," in George H. Daniels, ed., Nineteenth Century American Science A Reappraisal (Evanston, I11.: Northwestern University Press, 1972), pp. 181-209.(back to text)

166.

Ibid., p. 184.(back to text)

167.

Ibid., p. 201.(back to text)

168.

Slosson, "Democracy of Knowledge," pp. 105-106.(back to text)

169.

Slosson. Chats on Science, p. 222.(back to text)

170.

Ibid., pp. 222, 257.(back to text)

171.

Slosson. "Democracy of Knowledge," pp. 107, 115.(back to text)

172.

Ibid., p. 108.(back to text)

173.

Edwin Slosson, "Twentieth Century Science and Invention," in Preston W. Slosson, Twentieth Century Europe (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1927), p. 704.(back to text)

174.

Science News-Letter, January 14, 1928, p. 21.(back to text)

175.

Slosson, "Democracy of Knowledge," p. 108.(back to text)

176.

See, for example, "Declares Progress an Illusion; Urges Eugenics as a Religion," Science News Bulletin, n.s., June 20, 1921, p. 6, and Marjorie MacDill, "Will Blending of Races Produce Super-Men?" Science News- Letter, November 26, 1927, p. 337.(back to text)

177.

Slosson, "Modern Art," Science News-Letter, December 23, 1922, pp. 4-5.(back to text)

178.

Preston Slosson, "Edwin E. Slosson, Pioneer," p. 22.(back to text)

179.

Slosson, "Notes of a Talk to Trustees of Science Service at the Meeting of June 17, 1921," Science Service Records, Box 14, "Science Service Organization" folder, p. 11.(back to text)

180.

Slosson, "The Revival of Witchcraft" in Sermons of a Chemist (New York: Harcourt, Brace, and Co., 1925), p. 125.(back to text)

181.

Slosson. "The Great Backsliding" in Sermons of a Chemist, pp. 115-116. (back to text)

182.

Slosson. "Back to Nature? Never! Forward to the Machine," Independent, January 3, 1920, p. 506.(back to text)

183.

Slosson, "The Revival of Witchcraft," p. 124.(back to text)

184.

Slosson, "Notes of a Talk to Trustees . . . June 17, 1921, p. 12.(back to text)

185.

Slosson, Easy Lessons in Einstein, p. 61.(back to text)

186.

Ibid., pp. 98-99.(back to text)

187.

Slosson, Creative Chemistry, pp. 9-10; Sermons of a Chemist, p. 116, n.2.(back to text)

188.

Slosson. Creative Chemistry, p. 9.(back to text)

189.

Ibid., p. 312.(back to text)

190.

"0 You Chemistry," review of Creative Chemistry, by Edwin E. Slosson, in Independent, January 31, 1920, p. 186.(back to text)

191.

Preston Slosson, "Edwin E. Slosson, Pioneer," pp. 18-19.(back to text)

192.

Slosson, Easy Lessons in Einstein, p. 100.(back to text)

193.

Slosson, Sermons of a Chemist, p. 210.(back to text)

194.

Slosson, "The Fiction of Force," Independent, April 23, 1921, p. 425.(back to text)

195.

Slosson, Easy Lessons in Einstein, p. 100.(back to text)

196.

Slosson. Easy Lessons in Einstein, p. 100.(back to text)

197.

Slosson. Pragmatism," in A Number of Things, p. 140.(back to text)

198.

" Report to the Annual Meeting of the Board of Trustees, Science Service, May 1, 1930, by Watson Davis Managing Editor," science Service, Inc., Corporate Records, 1927-30, p.633(back to text)

199.

Benjamin Gruenberg, Science and the Public Mind (New York: McGraw-hill Book Co., Inc., 1935), pp.93, 135(back to text)

200.

Frank Luther Mott, The News in American (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1952), pp. 103-104(back to text)

201.

The conclusions of Hay’s thesis are presented in "Science reporting has grown out of tis ‘gee whiz’ phase" Editor and Publisher 103 (September 12, 1920):20. One of the other landmarks mentioned by Hay was the awarding of the Pulitzer Prize th Alva Johnston of the New York Times for his coverage of the 1922 meeting of the American Assciation for the Advancement of Science in boston, said to be the first scientific meeting to receive national news coverage, Ibid. What is not generally known is that Edwin Slosson and Watson Davis also cobered the meeting for Science Service (as they had covered the previous year’s meeting in Toronto), despite Meyer Berger’s assertion in The Story of the New York Tiomes that the only other reporter at the Boston meeting was David Dietz. David Dietz, " A Bit of History Anbout the Science-Writing Art by an Early Practitoner," National Association of Science Writers Newsletter 25 (Fall 1977):26(back to text)

202.

Introduction to National Association of Science Writers, p.1 (Pamphlet.)(back to text)

203.

Science Service, Inc., Corporate Records, 1927-30, p. 560(back to text)

204.

Ronald Tobey, The American Ideology of National Science, 1919-1930 (pittshurg: University of Pittsburg Press, 1971), p. 7(back to text)

205.

Ibid., pp.199-217(back to text)

206.

Quoted in Rober Kargon, ed., The Maturing of American Science (Washington D.C.: American Associaton for the Advancement of Science, 1974), p. 19(back to text)

207.

Sloson, " Notes of a Talk to Trustees of Science Service at teh Meeting of June 17, 1321," Science Service Records, Record Unit 7091, Sminthsonian Archives, Washingtion D.C., "Science Service Organization" folder p. 11(back to text)

208.

Slosson, " Annual Address of Directior of Science Service at Meeting of the Board of Trustees, Washington on April 28, 1927," Science Service, Inc., Corporate Records, 1921-27, p.385.(back to text)

209.

Science News-letter, August 7, 1925, p. 130; See Slosson’s files on " Witnesses - Dayton Trail" and "Evoloution - Tennessee" in Science Service Records, Box 9.(back to text)

210.

Slosson, " Annual Address of Director . . . April 28, 1927, " p. 385(back to text)

211.

"Report to the Anual Meeting of the Board of Trustees, Science Service, May 1, 1930, by Watson Davis, Managing Editor," p. 633(back to text)

212.

Oscar Handlin, "Science and Technology In Populat Cluture," in Gerald holton, ed., Science and Culture (Boston, Mass., Beacon Press, 1965), p. 198.(back to text)

213.

Slosson, "Notes of a Talk to Trustees . . . June 17, 1921,"p. 13. (back to text)

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Copyright David J. Rhees, 1979



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